You’ve probably come across all kinds of cleansing and detox programs online. There is a whole industry based around selling these plans and supplies to people trying to live healthier. Unfortunately, doctors largely agree that most of these plans have no real health benefits. They might even be harmful. It's best to skip them and follow a healthier lifestyle instead.


Finally, while many testimonial and anecdotal accounts exist of health improvements following a "detox", these are more likely attributable to the placebo effect; where people actually believe that they are doing something good and healthy. Yet, there is a severe lack of quantitative data. Some changes recommended in certain "detox" lifestyles are also found in mainstream medical advice (such as consuming a diet high in fruits and vegetables). These changes can often produce beneficial effects in and of themselves, and it is accordingly difficult to separate these effects from those caused by the more controversial detoxification recommendations.
The first question that comes up in context of spiritual health is whether you believe in spirits? And then there are related questions like – do you believe in God? good spirits and evil spirits? after-life? hell and heaven? etc. All are very philosophical questions and the only answer scientific reasoning can give to them is – ‘NO’. But I believe there is more to life than just science and so I will give my views regarding these questions in relation to the question of spiritual health.
People through their life-style and drug-abuse, decrease their immunity and create fertile grounds for these microorganisms. And people themselves act as the carriers and create conditions for their spread. Think of it this way – if there is no drug abuse, no sexual perversions, no promiscuity – what will be the rate of infection of HIV or Hepatitis-B? Extremely low. And that applies to most of the modern diseases in some way or the other. Bacteria and viruses cannot rage a war against us – it is us who help them kill us!

A la question "Pensez-vous que la pandémie globale actuelle a eu comme “effet positif” de souligner l'importance de l'épidémiosurveillance ?", le spécialiste nous répond par la positive. "Effectivement, elle met en lumière cet intérêt stratégique, et j'espère que les États mettront en place des dispositifs pour accroître cette dimension-là Mais finalement, quels vont être les leviers prioritaires pour renforcer l'épidémiosurveillance ? L'autre difficulté est que nous savons montrer a posteriori l'épidémiosurveillance mais, comme pour les séismes, nous avons encore du mal à concevoir des systèmes d'alerte efficace nous permettant d'anticiper suffisamment [les futures épidémies]. J'imagine qu'il y a une conscience aujourd'hui [de cette problématique] qui est plus forte qu'hier."
CHP is proud of our integrated model of care – when we say that we treat the whole person, we truly mean it. Behavioral health and nutrition services are located right at the medical practices, our dentists take your blood pressure before treating you, and our clinicians ask you about things such as housing, food insecurity, and other determinants that affect your health beyond the physical.
Let me give some real life examples to explain this. It is normal to be angry when somebody abuses you. But if you can’t let that anger go for a very long time, then everything is not right with you. It s normal to feel sad when somebody close to you passes away. But if you try to kill yourself after that, then you are not emotionally healthy. If you always feel elated (not just happy) without any good reason then you are not emotionally healthy.
Cette initiative promeut donc une vision holistique et intégrée de « La santé » (c'est-à-dire sans isoler la santé humaine, de la santé animale et de celle de l'environnement, et en cherchant à mieux comprendre et utiliser les interactions complexes qui existent entre ces trois domaines). Elle encourage une collaboration transdisciplinaire ou multidisciplinaire (à co-égalité) et une communication interdisciplinaire entre les domaines vétérinaires et médicaux (en incluant les médecins ostéopathes, dentistes, la santé mentale, etc.) ainsi qu'avec d'autres scientifiques concernés par la santé, les soins et l’environnement (santé environnementale) et avec des éthologues, anthropologues, économistes, sociologues, etc.
Directeur de recherche à l'Institut Génétique Environnement et Protection des plantes de Rennes, Christophe Mougel étudie les phytobiomes (l'association des plantes, de leur environnement de croissance et de leur microbiote), une toute nouvelle vision de la plante en tant qu'écosystème, ou en tant que “super organisme végétal”, comme il le décrit. Les travaux de son Institut consistent à mieux comprendre le rôle des microbiotes et leurs fonctions au sein des espèces végétales. Il s'agit de décrire et de comprendre ce lien en vue notamment de développer “une agriculture de précision voire une agriculture personnalisée à l'échelle d'une exploitation”, comme l'explique M. Mougel.
L'objectif du concept One Health, illustré par ces différents travaux en cours au sein de l'Inrae, est simple : “produire des connaissances et éclairer dans leur prise de décisions l'ensemble des acteurs concernés par ces enjeux de santé publique”.  A l'automne prochain, l'Institut fera un nouveau point, cette fois-ci concentré sur les substances toxiques se retrouvant dans notre chaîne alimentaire.
Finally, while many testimonial and anecdotal accounts exist of health improvements following a "detox", these are more likely attributable to the placebo effect; where people actually believe that they are doing something good and healthy. Yet, there is a severe lack of quantitative data. Some changes recommended in certain "detox" lifestyles are also found in mainstream medical advice (such as consuming a diet high in fruits and vegetables). These changes can often produce beneficial effects in and of themselves, and it is accordingly difficult to separate these effects from those caused by the more controversial detoxification recommendations.
Body cleansing and detoxification have been referred to as an elaborate hoax used by con artists to cure nonexistent illnesses. Most doctors contend that the 'toxins' in question do not even exist.[16][17] In response, alternative medicine proponents frequently cite heavy metals or pesticides as the source of toxification, however no evidence exists that detoxification approaches have a measurable effect on these or any other chemical levels. Medical experts state that body cleansing is unnecessary as the human body is naturally capable of maintaining itself, with several organs dedicated to cleansing the blood and gut.[18]
×