Finally, while many testimonial and anecdotal accounts exist of health improvements following a "detox", these are more likely attributable to the placebo effect; where people actually believe that they are doing something good and healthy. Yet, there is a severe lack of quantitative data. Some changes recommended in certain "detox" lifestyles are also found in mainstream medical advice (such as consuming a diet high in fruits and vegetables). These changes can often produce beneficial effects in and of themselves, and it is accordingly difficult to separate these effects from those caused by the more controversial detoxification recommendations.

Eliminating foods such as caffeine, alcohol, processed food (including any bread), pre-made or canned food, salt, sugar, wheat, red meat, pork, fried and deep fried food, yellow cheese, cream, butter and margarine, shortening, etc., while focusing on pure foods such as raw fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, raw nuts and seeds, fish, vegetable oils, herbs and herbal teas, water, etc.[citation needed]


Various modalities of body cleansing are currently employed, ranging from physical treatments (e.g. colon cleansing), to dietary restrictions (i.e. avoiding foods) or dietary supplements. Some variants involve the use of herbs and supplements that purportedly speed or increase the effectiveness of the process of cleansing. Several naturopathic and homeopathic preparations are also promoted for cleansing; such products are often marketed as targeting specific organs, such as fiber for the colon or juices for the kidneys.
↑ Revenir plus haut en : a b c et d Position française sur le concept « One Health/Une seule santé » : Pour une approche intégrée de la santé face à la mondialisation des risques sanitaires French Position on the One Health Concept: For an Integrated Approach to Health in View of the Globalization of Health Risks Document de travail stratégique Strategic Working Document [archive] Août 2011, PDF, 32 pages

The first definition of health has a basic fault in it – it tries to define a primary state through a secondary state. Health is a primary state. It cannot be fully defined through a secondary phenomenon, disease. And then there is a larger question. Does being free from any disease which can be given a name, makes one healthy? I think, no. I know so many people who have no known disease and yet they are not healthy. I know a woman who likes to show off her tons of jewelry to those who can’t have it; a woman who snobs at everyone. She has no known disease. But would you call her healthy? I know a man, who is a couch potato. He goes to his job and does nothing else. He does not help his wife with family responsibilities. He behaves with her as if she is his servant. He has no known disease. But would you call him healthy? I know a man who brags about his achievements till everybody around drops dead. He has no known disease. But would you call him healthy?
CHP is proud of our integrated model of care – when we say that we treat the whole person, we truly mean it. Behavioral health and nutrition services are located right at the medical practices, our dentists take your blood pressure before treating you, and our clinicians ask you about things such as housing, food insecurity, and other determinants that affect your health beyond the physical.
Body cleansing and detoxification have been referred to as an elaborate hoax used by con artists to cure nonexistent illnesses. Most doctors contend that the 'toxins' in question do not even exist.[16][17] In response, alternative medicine proponents frequently cite heavy metals or pesticides as the source of toxification, however no evidence exists that detoxification approaches have a measurable effect on these or any other chemical levels. Medical experts state that body cleansing is unnecessary as the human body is naturally capable of maintaining itself, with several organs dedicated to cleansing the blood and gut.[18]
“Le mouvement One Health (“une seule santé”), initié au début des années 2000, fait suite à la recrudescence et à l'émergence de maladies infectieuses, en raison notamment de la mondialisation des échanges. Le principe [de One Health] est simple : la protection de la santé de l'Homme passe par la santé de l'animal et celle de l'ensemble des écosystèmes”, peut-on lire sur le site de l'Inrae. Alors que nous traversons une période de pandémie mondiale, comme l'explique Philippe Mauguin, PDG de l'Inrae, il est important de rappeler que 60 % des maladies infectieuses humaines proviennent du monde animal : c'est la zoonose. De plus, 70 % de ces maladies nous sont transmises par les animaux sauvages. L'objectif de cet Institut qui a vu le jour en janvier 2020, au travers de One Health, est de démontrer le lien entre la dégradation de la biodiversité et l'émergence de ces nouvelles zoonoses. Pour cela, plusieurs départements et unités de recherche de l'Inrae consacrent leurs études aux facteurs de dégradation et des pressions imposées sur l'ensemble des écosystèmes. “La problématique des conséquences directes et indirectes de différents facteurs de l'environnement sur les santés [...] est un sujet de préoccupation pour l'Inrae”, explique Thierry Caquet, Directeur Scientifique-Environnement de l'Institut.
The premise of body cleansing is based on the Ancient Egyptian and Greek idea of autointoxication, in which foods consumed or in the humoral theory of health that the four humours themselves can putrefy and produce toxins that harm the body. Biochemistry and microbiology appeared to support the theory in the 19th century, but by the early twentieth century, detoxification based approaches quickly fell out of favour.[6][7] Despite abandonment by mainstream medicine, the idea has persisted in the popular imagination and amongst alternative medicine practitioners.[8][9][10] In recent years, notions of body cleansing have undergone something of a resurgence, along with many other alternative medical approaches. Nonetheless, mainstream medicine continues to view the field as unscientific and anachronistic.[9]
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